Kant's Ethics: The Clavis to an Index (Part 1)

It is said in the Book of Poetry, “Although the fish sinks and lies as the bottom, it is still quite clearly seen.” Therefore the superior man examines his heart, that there may be nothing wrong there, and that he may have no cause for dissatisfaction with himself. That wherein the superior man cannot be equaled is simply this,-his work which other men cannot see.


It is said in the Book of Poetry, “Looked at in your apartment, be there free from shame, where you are exposed to the light of heaven.” Therefore the superior man even when he is not moving, has a feeling of reverence, and while he speaks not he has the feeling of truthfulness.


It is said in the Book of Poetry, “In silence is the offering presented, and the spirit approached to; there is not the slightest contention.” Therefore the superior man does not use rewards and the people are stimulated to virtue. He does not show anger, and the people are awed more than by hatchets and battle-axes.


It is said in the Book of Poetry, “What needs no display is virtue. All the princes imitate it.” Therefore the superior man being sincere and reverential, the whole world is conducted to a state of happy tranquility.



(Immanuel Kant was an influential German Philosopher during the Age of enlightenment (1724-1804). His contributions to ethics has been more substantial than his work in metaphysics and epistemology. Kent argued that an action does not reflect a moral worth but rather the motive behind an action)


- Andrew Dickson White, James Edmunds, James ins Edmunds, Edmunds, Kant's Ethics: The Clavis to an Index........, Louisville courier-journal print 2018




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